Congress approves fertility services for wounded veterans, but no funding

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Silhouette of two WWII Army Soldiers/Medics carrying a wounded soldier on a litter to safety and help. Because the soldiers are running there is some blurring on legs and feet. The U.S. military in World War II had an organized, structured system for evacuation and treatment of casualties that stretched from frontline foxholes to hospitals in the United States homeland, based on medical care echelons. Sick or wounded individuals would be transported from one echelon to another as rapidly and efficiently as possible, subject to conditions which often prevented optimal handling, to optimize their care and potential to return to duty.

Silhouette of two WWII Army Soldiers/Medics carrying a wounded soldier on a litter to safety and help. Because the soldiers are running there is some blurring on legs and feet. The U.S. military in World War II had an organized, structured system for evacuation and treatment of casualties that stretched from frontline foxholes to hospitals in the United States homeland, based on medical care echelons. Sick or wounded individuals would be transported from one echelon to another as rapidly and efficiently as possible, subject to conditions which often prevented optimal handling, to optimize their care and potential to return to duty.

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Army Cpl. Tyler Wilson was 20 years old when he was hit in a firefight in Afghanistan and paralyzed from the waist down.

Eleven years later, Wilson is five months away from becoming a father — a privilege that cost he and wife Crystal Wilson more than $14,000 in fertility treatments — service-connected health care that isn’t provided by the Veterans Affairs Department.

On Wednesday, severely disabled veterans like Wilson celebrated as Congress approved legislation that allows the VA to provide fertility services or cover the cost of adoption for veterans with service-connected infertility.

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